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Ruri Kippenbrock


Posts Tagged ‘tanabata’

Tenugui mumbling Vol.96 – Make a wish – Tenugui Tanzaku

Friday, June 24th, 2011
Tanzaku is a Wish Tag for Tanabata Festival

Tanzaku is a Wish Tag for Tanabata Festival

July 7th is a Tanabata Festival in Japan, also called Star Festival. The story of Tanabata came from an ancient Asian folk legend about the Cow Herder Star (Altair) and his lover the Princess Weaver Star (Vega), who had been banished by her father to opposite ends of the Milky Way, doomed to meet each other but once a year at this time. If it rains that night and the stars cannot be seen, the lovers must wait another year to be re-united.

Each summer in Japan, children and their parents prepare for the festival by writing their wishes on Tanzaku, narrow strips of colored paper and hanging them with other paper ornaments on bamboo branches displayed at the entrance to the their homes. Everyone prays that the sky will be fair, the lovers will meet, and their wishes will be granted.

I made Tanzaku with Japanese 5-Yen coins last Tanabata. 5-yen coin has many good meanings. We call it Goen, which means good relationship. The first 5-yen was printed in 1949, it has three symbols on the face of coin, and one on the other side. Rice as Agricultures, Gear as Industry, Stripes (wave) as Fishery Industry, and new leaves as Forestry. It was designed with Wishes of reconstruction and development of Japan.

I made 5-yen Tanzaku for you all this year also. Any tenugui order until July 7th (Thursday), you’ll receive a 5-yen Tanzaku with your Tenugui.
Or any tenugui fans who want to have 5-yen Tanzaku, please send email to mail@wuhaonyc.com , I’ll send you one for your wish come true.

What is your wish year 2011?

 Love You

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.80 – AMANOGAWA by The Kitsune Ensemble

Sunday, December 5th, 2010
Billy Fox - composer & director of The Kitsune Ensemble

Billy Fox - composer & director of The Kitsune Ensemble

Arei Sekiguchi - Drum The Kitsune Ensemble

Arei Sekiguchi - drum

Christopher Hoffman - chello

Christopher Hoffman - chello

Gary Pickard - clarinet

Gary Pickard - clarinet

John Savage - flute

John Savage - flute

Miki Hirose - trumpet

Miki Hirose - trumpet

Yayoi Ikawa - keyboards

Yayoi Ikawa - keyboards

Yoshi Waki - bass

Yoshi Waki - bass

The Kitsune Ensemble

The Kitsune Ensemble

On Friday Decemver 17th at 8pm, AMANOGAWA will premiere at the New York Center for Art & Media Studies in Manhattan. Inspired by the Tanabata Legend, this hourlong production combines original music with contemporary theatrical techniques inspired by the Kuroko stagehands of Kabuki Theatre.

Composed by Billy Fox, with theatrical direction by Tomi Tsunoda, AMANOGAWA conbines classical, modal jazz and free improvisation, while also subtly drawing from traditional Japanese elements such as Koto tuning and Shakuhachi flute stylings.

Improvising chamber group The Kitsune Ensemble is comprised of Billy Fox as a composer & director, has previously performed at Washington DC’s Kennedy Center, the Planet Arlington World Music Series, and Manhattan’s Spring Fever Festival.

The legend of Tanabata (“Evening of the Seventh”) concerns the divine lovers Orihime (“Weaving Princess”) and Hikoboshi (“Cow Herder Star”) who are banished by Tentei (“Sky King”) to opposite sides of the impassable Amanogawa (“River of Heaven” Milky Way). On one day each year, the lovers are allowed to reunited… only to be torn apart again for the rest of the year.

The annual Tanabata Matsuri (festival), celebrate each July 7 or August 7 in numerous areas of Japan, is considered a time of hope and celebration. But AMANOGAWA interprets the story in an unconventional way, seeing the Tanabata legend as a rebuke against imposed social and occupational roles that inhibit our deepest desires and passions as individuals.

We furnished Tenugui to The Kitsune Ensemble for their World Premiere of Amanogawa. I am so excited to see how Tenugui can be used in AMANOGAWA…?
If you have any chance, please come and see their performance at the theater. Of course, I’ll be there also!

Event: World Premiere of AMANOGAWA
Date: Friday December 17th. 8pm (doors open at 7:30pm)
Venue: New York Center for Art & Media Studies
Address: 44 W 28th street. 7th floor, NY, NY 10001
Ticket: $10 at the door
Information:? www.kitsuneensemble.org/news.html

Hope to see you there!!!!!

band

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.70 – Tanabata (star festival)

Wednesday, June 30th, 2010
write a wish on tanzaku, and hang it on the bamboo tree

write a wish on tanzaku, and hang it on the bamboo tree

Tanabata is Japanese star festival that is celebrated every year on July 7th. Some parts of Japan celebrate in August according Lunar year. When this time of year comes around, people write their wishes on tanzaku which are strips of paper, and hang them on bamboo trees.

new arrival - tanabata tenugui!

new arrival - tanabata tenugui!

Tanabata is also known as the story of Hikoboshi (Altair) and Orihime (Vega). The Japanese version of star story is;
It’s origins come from the legend of the Altar and Vega.?Two lovers separated by the milky way, and they are allowed to meet just once a?year on July 7th.

Tenugui is still made by hand during most of the production process, washes, dries, cuts and folds….
When they cut tenugui separately, some tenugui scraps are left over, and they use those scraps as stuffing for the packing, however, they are actually beautiful by themselves.

Our special tenugui tanzaku was made with tenugui and Japanese 5-yen coin.

Our special tenugui tanzaku was made with tenugui and Japanese 5-yen coin.

I made Tenugui Tanzaku(wish note) with tenugui scraps today. And I added a Japanese 5-yen coin (about 5-cents) on it as charms. 5-yen has many good meanings, we call it GOEN. Goen also means Good Luck in Japanese. The first 5-yen was printed in 1949, it has three symbols on the face of coin;
Ear of rice as Agricultures, gear as Industry, and strips as Fishery Industry
It was designed after the World War II, for wishes for development of all three industries.

What are your wishes?
My wish is very simple…. “Happiness” for all of us.
Kisses

- to be continued…

From: Ruri