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Ruri Kippenbrock


Posts Tagged ‘japanese tradition’

Tenugui Mumbling Vol. 137 – Omiyage Tenugui

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

omiyage_tenugui_1

O-MIYAGE (お土産) is one of Japanese culture, means a gift. For greeting seasons, celebrations and anniversaries, promotion tool for new products, new shops, and  new restaurants, or even your self, Tenugui has been using as a Omiyage over centuries.

Now I am ready to attend special Tenugui event this coming Thursday (12/4), these tenugui are Omiyage Tenugui for the guests. 30-people only, will receive a free tenugui at the event.

See event details at Tenugui Mumbling Vol. 136  Enjoy Tenugui with the Five Senses!
Hurry up, and make reservation now \(*v*)/

12/4 (Thursday)  Open 6:45 pm  Start 7pm till 8:30pm
Venue:  TOKYO TAPAS CAFE (7 Cornelia street @ W 4th Street, NYC)
(Phone) 212 242 6333  (Email) tokyotapascafenyc@gmail.com

Hope to see you at the event!

… to be continued.

Operator

From: Ruri

 

Tenugui mumbling Vol.134 – Legendary Character (TATOO TENUGUI)

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014
Japanese Legendary Character

Japanese Legendary Character

I am very excited our new collaboration with HORISHI (Tattoo Artist) – TATTOO TENUGUI  collection just arrived at wuhaonyc.com.

This TATTOO tenugui using five Japanese legendary character in design. Let me introduce you these character today :-)

Tengu, Okame, Oni, Hyottoko and Hannya

Tengu, Okame, Oni, Hyottoko and Hannya

From left to right toward to you;

TENGU – Tengu is a type of legendary creature, and also considered a type of Shinto god. The character usually has a long nose.

OKAME – Okame also called Otafuk, is a legendary comical female character, Okame means Tortoise symbol for long life, and Otafuku means Much Good Fortune.

ONI – Oni is a kind of yōkai from Japanese folklore, variously translated as demons, devils, ogres or trolls.

HYOTTOKO – Hyottoko is a legendary comical male character in Japan. The origin of the name comes from hi ( fire) and otoko (man) because the character is blowing fire with a bamboo pipe,
that is why he has a funny shaped mouth. He wearing Mame-shibori which is the most typical dots printed Tenugui.

HANNYA – Hannya is a character of a jealous female demon or serpent. It possesses two sharp bull-like horns, metallic eyes, and a leering mouth split from ear to ear. The name Hannya is a Japanese word for wisdom.

Very Cool, aren’t they?

- to be continued….
Ghetto Fab

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol. 129 – Hina matsuri

Monday, March 3rd, 2014
Mini Hina-Ningyo and Mame Shibori Tenugui :-)

Mini Hina-Ningyo and Mame Shibori Tenugui :-)

March 3rd is Hina Matsuri, also called Doll’s Festival or Girl’s day!
Hina Matsuri began in Heian Period (794-1185). In ancient Japanese custom called Hina-nagashi, which a set of Hina-Ningyo (dolls) set on a small boat, and sent down a river to the sea to sending away bad omen from their children. Over  the centuries, the ceremony has been changing, and families who have daughters, decorate the set of Hina-ningyo in the room, and pray her happiness during the Hina-matsuri season.
In myth, some family believes that their daughter would not be able to marry, if they don’t put Hinamatsuri dolls away, just after the Hinamatsuri. So usually Hina-ningyo was put away in the box, and send to the storage right after the festival.

I heard very interesting story last night. It’s getting more popular to buy own Hina-ningyo among over the 40-years old ladies, who haven’t married yet. The tradition has been changing along with changing generation.

Anyway….. this is my mini Hina-Ningyo with Mame shibori Tenugui :-)

Happy Girl’s Day, Tenugui fans!

- to be continued…

Ginger

From: Ruri

 

 

 

Tenugui Mumbling Vol.117 – Tenugui Money Wrap

Monday, April 29th, 2013
money_wrap_sakura_up1

Japanese traditional style money envelop made with Sakura Tenugui! A Musubi-kiri bow is suitable to use for a wedding or any other celebrations, except a baby shower.

It’s Spring time, season of Graduation and Wedding, and many celebrations are on the way. We have a great gift idea for your family and friends, TENUGUI MONEY WRAP!

In Japan, we also customarily send some money as a gift for celebration, so their family and friends can use it for their future needs. We have a special money envelop, called O-SHU-GI BUKURO (お祝儀袋), means Celebration Envelop. Usually, comes with two parts, a white paper envelop for putting money, and outer wrapping with Japanese washi paper, and then, ties a bow with Japanese traditional strings called Mizuhiki.

Mizuhiki has some traditonal rules; let me explain about Mizuhiki. See the photo below;
mizuhiki_knots

The top one called HANA-MUSUBU, just like a standard bow knot. HANA-MUSUBU can unwind and make a knots in many times, so it uses for the event desired to occur repeatedly, like a new born baby and anniversary.

The middle one called MUSUBI-KIRI. MUSUBI-KIRI was knotted very tightly, and can’t unwind after made a knot, so it uses for the event not desired to occur again, such as wedding, celebration for the recovery. MUSUBI-KIRI is also used for funeral and memorial ceremony, but only uses black and white strings, instead red and white (or other colorful colors).

The last one called AWAJI-MUSUBI, AWAJI-MUSUBI was knotted tightly and many circle layers, wishing a long relationship, so it uses for the event like a wedding or anniversaries as well.

money_wrap_fujiwave_up1

KICHO design with Musubi-kiri bow is a perfect money wrap for Wedding, and any celebrations, except a baby shower.

money_wrap_owl_up1

OWL DESIGN and HANA-MUSUBI is a perfect money wrap for baby gift and graduation, birthday, and any events want to have repeatedly.

Tenugui Money Wrap is made with a half size Tenugui, so can be used as a Handkerchief later, and keep it with a beautiful celebration memory.
Isn’t so lovely idea?

- to be continued…
Bride

From: Ruri

 

 

 

Tenugui mumbling Vol.104 – Tenugui for Tea Towel

Thursday, June 7th, 2012
Using Tenugui as a tea towel

Using Tenugui as a tea towel

We received beautiful photos from Tenugui Fan Blair from San Diego, California. He is a Tea master, and use his Tenugui to handle his tetsubin (Iron tea pot). He said that Tenugui is perfect for holding the hot lid and wiping down a tetsubin to keep it looking great and rust free. He keep one handy for all tea sessions.

Use tenugui to hold a lid of Tetsubin

Use tenugui to hold a lid of Tetsubin

Blair practice Cha-No-Yu, Sencha-Do and Chinese Gongfu-Cha. He use a different seasonal themed tenugui every month to handle his cast iron tea kettle. Tenugui keeps him focused on the moment and the season at hand while protecting his fingers from the hot kettle. He use tenugui with his tetsubin for both japanese Sencha-Do and Chinese Gongfu-Cha as a tea towel.

Surely, Tenugui can use many different ways. Thank you Blair for sharing your Tenugui Story with us. Let’s have a cup of tea, with your Tenugui!

- to be continued…

SmileyCentral.com

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.100 – TENUGUI MAGIC Vol.07 How to wear Tenugui Misanga

Sunday, August 7th, 2011

TENUGUI MAGIC Vol.07 – How to wear Tenugui Misanga from Ruri Kippenbrock (wuhaonyc) on Vimeo.

TENUGUI MAGIC debut at wuhaonyc. com. Our first TENUGUI MAGIC project #01 is Tenugui Misanga. Showing you some ideas of how to wear Tenugui Misanga, enjoy \(*v*)/

Baby

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.99 – TENUGUI MAGIC

Sunday, July 31st, 2011
odds and ends tenugui cloth, buttons, and Masaki yarn... my TENUGUI MAGIC WORLD

odds and ends tenugui cloth, buttons, and Masaki yarn... my TENUGUI MAGIC WORLD

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It has been in my thoughts since I had started my own Tenugui business in 2007, and finally It has arrived…? YES, it’s TENUGUI MAGIC!

I made a few movies showing you how to use Tenugui, and I called?them TENUGUI MAGIC. This 100% cotton rectangular cloth has many more possibilities than imaginable. It’s one of my dreams to create my own tenugui styles, and bring simple pleasures to you through this simple cotton cloth.

I always think about tenugui craftsman?in Japan when I hold tenugui?in my hand. Tenugui is created using the same method since the mid 1800′s, and is still made mostly by hand.? Washi paper stencil, molding, dyeing, washing and drying, and cutting each piece of Tenugui. I feel the tenugui spirit that has been carried along many decades of Japanese history.

TENUGUI MAGIC?is my own brand to provide new tenugui goods, and also, to?introduce you to the usability of Tenugui.? “Mottainai”?means don’t waste, and TENUGUI MAGIC was created along with Japanese economic philosophy, using odds and ends of Tenugui cloth or used tenugui (along with all the memories) reconstructed in various styles, and giving new life to a piece of cloth.
We will remake your favorite old tenugui?into a one of a kind accessory, bag, cover, box, or any other item.

“Reconstruct”, “Remake” and “Respect”….
I would like to express my appreciation to Japanese tradition and artisans.

My plan is to create a new sytle each month. Many more new styles are on the way, so please stay tuned?to TENUGUI MAGIC!

Kitty 2
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- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.85 – Hinamatsuri (Doll’s Festival) “a Hint of Spring”

Saturday, February 26th, 2011

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My Hina-Ningyo.. 45-years old!

March 3rd is Hina-matsuri (Doll’s festival) in Japan. This is the day to celebrate young girls growing up and being happy. There is also Tango-no-sekku, or Kodomo-no-hi (Children’s day) in May to celebrate boys.

The photo of Hina-ningyo (Dolls) was made by my Aunt Yachiyo when I was born. They have been traveling many cities and many countries with me. I guess they would be eligible for tons of mileage.
Originally from Osaka Japan,? we moved to Yokohama first… and then to?Beijing, Dalian, and Shanghai, China… and then on the boat to Texas… and on the road to New York. Hope they like New York as much as I do now!

Life is very interesting, you never know what will come to you next. Sometimes people are afraid to change,?their location, school, work, partner, and life in general. Whatever it is, open your heart, open your eyes, and listen to your inner whispering… it will bring new possibilities to your life.

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Kimono de Jazz at the Kitano

Kimono de Jazz at the Kitano

?We had an event “Kimono de Jazz” at the Kitano?last month. I used my yellow komon Tenugui as a kimono collar, and combined it with the cherry petal Kimono that came from my mother. She said that she wore it for her college ceremony… over fifty years ago!!!! The elegance of Japan has carried over to the next generation… and with our own style!
I love both tradition and change! How about you, Tenugui fans?

Sending you a hint of Spring along with Hina-ningyo and Three Kimono beauties!!!

?st-patty-s-cover-pinwheel

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.26 – Smile from New York – Japan Art Matsuri, Kimono de Night and Presidential inauguration 2009

Friday, January 23rd, 2009
Japan Art Matsuri 2008 at Greenpoint Brooklyn

Japan Art Matsuri 2008 at the Polish & Slavic Center Greenpoint Brooklyn photo by Motoyuki Ishibashi

We joined Japan Art Matsuri 2008 (JAM2008) last November in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. JAM is an annual Japanese contemporary festival that is organized by Faune Dance Trope, who were celebrating 6th season. Many talented Japanese performers such as musicians, dancers, and artists who live in New York get together and share their amazing performances. This was our first show with JAM and we are so proud of ourselves to be their Tenugui vendor. I surely enjoyed showing our Tenugui Art and watching such energetic performances with an audience. It was the most remarkable Japanese festival for talented young artists in New York.
I would like to thank very much the Faune Dance Trope and JAM supporters that gave us a great opportunity. And many thanks to all the performers and the audience for sharing your great spirit with us… and bringing me a big smile!

kimono de night at tango

kimono de Night at NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts

Kimono de Night is a monthly event that is organized by Feather Stone LLC ( Kumi Haneishi/President ). Most of the event members are Ms. Haneishi’s students and have taken lessons “HOW TO WEAR KIMONO YOURSELF”. Kimono is part of Japan’s great culture, that has many traditional values as well as complicated rules. It sounds silly but most of my generation can’t wear Kimono by ourselves even though we grew up in Japan. That was true for myself until I met Kumi-sensei.
She creates these events for the Kimono Lovers in New York to enjoy the Art of Kimono and also to encourage them to wear it themselves. So, we get together once a month with our beautiful Kimonos and have dinner or go to see performances like Opera, Dance, or even a comedy show. I always enjoy her events with my kimono, that has been handed down in my family that have many memories and stories. For instance, my mother wore it when she visited her future mother-in-law (my grandma) the first time, my aunt wore it when she came to see new born baby (me), and my grandmother wore it when she attended the ceremony of my grandfather’s receiving emperor’s medal… all Kimono are so special for me. And see! I use my Tenugui on my Kimono collar and enjoy my own style now. I am sure my Kimono is smiling the same as I do… and Yes, here in New York!

My dearest Kumi-sensei and Me! <br>I use my Tenugui on my Kimono collar as a new style.

My dearest Kumi-sensei and Me! I use my Tenugui on my Kimono collar as a new style.

January 20, 2009… It was a moment of history in the United State. I don’t like to watch too much TV, because it is too much information to me and also so negative. But I watched all day during inauguration and saw big shinny smile on all of America’s face. We all have many difficult problems and bad days in the midst of crisis. But I do believe that each of our SMILES will help us bring HOPE to pursue the new coming days…

- to be continue…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.04 – 1mm of difference

Friday, August 3rd, 2007

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Kabuki is a traditional form of Japanese theatre. Ka (歌) means Sing, Bu(舞) means Dance, and Ki(伎) means Skill. Heisei Nakamura-za performed at Lincoln Center in New York from July 16 to 22. My family name in Japanese is uncommon, and my friends and even my family said I am not like Japanese the way I am, although, I have 100% pure Japanese blood (but with low blood pressure). Anyway, I have never seen a Kabuki performance in my life. Perhaps because I was nice to a homeless person or maybe the stars aligned for me that day. I was able to get a free ticket for the play “Hokaibo” (Thank you Vanilla Graphics!!!!!) only 30-minutes before the performance began. I jumped on the subway and dashed over to Lincoln Center, and the play had just started. Needless to say, I didn’t even have enough time to go to the bathroom before the performance.

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Amazing, amazing, amazing; the story was so funny, and so was their acting. I couldn’t believe how beautiful their costumes were, how fresh the colors were, how attractive Kabuki actors are, how detailed their stage was, how interesting their music is… Most of all, the Kabuki actor Kanzaburo Nakamura’s eyes had so much emotion a 1mm of difference of expression; For me, he is art and symbolized the beauty of Japan. I could not imagine the effort and sacrifice they make in their daily lives. They have carried this traditional Japanese theatre through their family for many generations. I laughed, I smiled, I was scared, and I cried. It was not because nature was calling so badly, but rather because I was so impressed in Kabuki that 1mm of difference made whole thing perfect. Someday I would like to make Tenugui that has 1mm of difference from any other Tenugui. 1mm of difference, that is art and it makes everything perfect.

- to be continued…

From Ruri mumbling dated on August 01, 2007