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Ruri Kippenbrock


Posts Tagged ‘artist’

Tenugui mumbling Vol.89 – A Peace of Cloth – Quilting Arts

Monday, April 11th, 2011

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Title "Japanese Rhapsody in Blue" completed in June 2009

My happiest time is reading messages from Tenugui fans everyday. Sometime I receive letters, e-mail, and photos.
I always smile myself,?and imagine their smiling faces with their?tenugui. Some tenugui fans are martial arts practitioners, Kendo players, cancer patients, and some of them are artists,?musicians, sushi chefs…??and also quilting artists.
I am so happy to know that many people love?tenugui in many different ways, that’s exactly what I like to see. Tenugui has limitless possibilities, and no boundaries.

Elisabeth-san?is an amazing quilting artist, and also a member of the Japan Quilting Group in Australia?. She visited Japan a few years ago for her quilting tour, and fell in love with Japan and Japanese traditional textile, especially indigo cottons (aizome). I can see her love of Japan from her compositions.

The first quilt is called “Japanese Rhapsody in Blue”, it was completed in June 2009. This quilt is machine-pieced and hand-quilted.

Title "Noshi Matters" completed in Jan 2011

Title is Noshi Matters, completed in January 2011

The second quilt is called “Noshi Matters”, and was completed in early January, 2011. Noshi is a bow, and is used during very special Japanese traditional occasions. Machine-pieced and hand-quilted, the size is 36 by 63 inches.

Title is My Japanese Journey - her new composition

Title is My Japanese Journey - her new composition

Kimono, Japanese houses, and flowers... so beautiful together

Kimono, Japanese houses, and flowers... so beautiful together

The last composition is called “My Japanese Journey”, machine-pieced and hand-appliqued, with sashiko, and she is working on hand-quilting now. The size is 58 by 73 inches. I can see her beautiful memory of Japan trip on her quilt.

A Peace of cloth…. that I felt from her compositions. A precious fabric was sewed and linked together, and she put a life into her quilts.? I think Quilting Arts are just like a magic!

Thank you very much for sharing these beautiful quilts and your love of Japan with us. The beauty of Japan will stay forever in your blue peace of cloth….

thank-you

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.73 – Tenugui ideas from wuhao friends

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010
Andrew is an artist. He uses tenugui as a face mask when he makes his compositons.

Andrew is an artist. He uses tenugui as a face mask when he makes his compositons.

Hope you are enjoying your summer (or maybe winter?) where ever you are.

We received a few photos from our wuhao friends. I?never thought that Tenugui could be used as a mask! Andrew-san is an artist and lives in California. He?discovered tenugui from his dear friend, and since then, he is a big tenugui lover. He told me that he never forgets to take tenugui anywhere he goes.?

Summer festival in Naeba, Japan. Many visitors use tenugui as hats! Can you see them?

Summer festival in Naeba, Japan. Many visitors use tenugui as hats! Can you see them?

Ayumi-san sent us a photo from Japan. She went to Naeba, and joined the summer festival. She said that tenugui is very popular in Japan now, especially in the summer festival. People use it as a towel, a hat, a head wrap… etc etc. Enjoy summer and tenugui~~~~ Yes, It’s Summer~~~~!

Thank you for sharing your tenugui photos, Andrew-san and Ayumi-san!
We always welcome your tenugui photos and stories on our site.
so please don’t be shy! Let us hear from you and about your Tenugui story!
Looking forward to hear from y’all soon!

Have a wonderful summer with your Tenugui, dear wuhao fiends!
Shy Whistler

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.52 – Japan Art Masuri 2009

Friday, December 25th, 2009
wuhaonyc Artist Booth @ JAM 2009 - photo by Willson Lee

wuhaonyc Artist Booth @ JAM - photo by Willson Lee

Tenugui Ninja with UZUHI - photo by Willson Lee

Tenugui Ninja with UZUHI - photo by Willson Lee

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What is tenugui? I always enjoy to tell about Tenugui. - photo by Willson Lee

What is tenugui? I always enjoy to tell about Tenugui. - photo by Willson Lee

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We always have a fun with Tenugui - photo by Willson Lee

We always have a fun with Tenugui - photo by Willson Lee

Here are some photos from JAM 2009 (Japan Art Matsuri 2009) by Willson Lee. I surely enjoyed the event very much this year also, as you can see on the pictures!
Many talented Japanese artists, musicians, and dancers came to New York to make their dreams come true.? They work very hard everyday and night to make their living, and keep their spirits alive.
JAM is one of the best events for us to perform our daily efforts, and express our passion for the arts.
Thank you very much JAM and JAM support teams for giving us this very special opportunity.
And thank you again to everybody who came to share with us the great energy of Art Festival!!!

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling Vol.49 – The beauty is in that difference No.03 Matsuri

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009
Happi (robe), Hachimaki (head-band) and Happy smile - Symbol of Matsuri - photo by TETSU

Happi (robe), Hachimaki (head-band) and Happy smile - Symbol of Matsuri - photo by TETSU

omikoshi (small shrine) is the main act in MATSURI - photo by TETSU

omikoshi (small shrine) is the main act in MATSURI - photo by TETSU

Matsuri is a festival in Japanese. People wear Happi (robe) and tie a?Hachimaki (Tenugui headband)? on their heads, and carry Mikoshi (a small shrine) all around the city. These lively photos took by TETSU in Japan. We can feel Matsuri spirit from his photos.

Dear wuhao friends, guess what?
Japan Art Matsuri 2009 will be held this weekend in Greenpoint, Brooklyn! The 7th annual Japan Art Matsuri is presented by Faune Dance Troupe, many talented dancers, singers, Samurai performance, bands, and artists will be gathered together and showing their art of work there. Oh, our favorite Japanese Acoustic Punk Band UZUHI will be on stage also. Not only that, we will have MIKOSHI performance during stages, just like Japanese Matsuri!
And of course, we will join this year also as a tenugui artist booth.

Please come and join Japanese Art Matsuri with us! Looking forward to seeing you there!!!!!

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.13 – Tenugui museum – Japanese Design “Cooking Time”

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

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Thank you cards from the Gordon School, they are on my treasure boxes.

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Tenugui museum in my kitchen, the most favorite place in the world.

I got handmade Thank you cards from the young artists of The Gordon School. It was the last day of year 2007, I found a package in front of my door just before ahead to my friend place. Sitting on the subway sheet and opened a package, it was a BIG surprise from them. Each of young artists used Origami and decorated by their own creations or drawing their own designs on the cards. Thank you all and Tori, sending me such a wonderful treasure. Last day of year 2007, I was on the subway with full of happy smile and the warming greeting…one of the best day of my life!

I love cooking, especially cook for someone very special. Chopping vegetables, saute foods on the pan… The sounds of cooking, the aroma from delight dishes and love as a spice… perfect collaborations! I use Tenugui as a kitchen cloth or a place mat everyday. Because Tenugui dry fast and easy to wash by hands, not only that! They are all so beautiful. I have a special corner in my kitchen called Tenugui museum where is the most favorite place in the world now!

We made Tenugui Museum on our web-site also. Please enjoy the beauty of Tenugui at our Tenugui Museum.

The Gordon School – composition #05 ? Cooking Time -

“Cooking Time”

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My Tenugui is filled with images of the basic utensils that you need for cooking.

I choose this subject because cooking is important to me.

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Students artist showing “Cooking Time”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on January 16, 2008

Tenugui mumbling vol.11 – the night before Christmas – Japanese Design “Winter in New England”

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007
Rockefeller center Christmas lighting

Rockefeller center Christmas lighting

Rockefeller Center New York The tallest Christmas tree

The night before Christmas decoration

The night before Christmas decoration

My little Christmas tree “The night before the Christmas”

- The night before Christmas -

I would like to send y’all a short poem today for this special season.

It’s 4am now and I’m watching you sleep…

I’ve seen the sunset in the ocean in so many countries.

I’ve seen moutains kiss the sky in so many places.

I’ve seen desert’s sand glow from the sun.

I’ve seen the moon reflect it’s comforting watching over me from a mountain’s lake.

… but nothing in this world is as beautiful and as peaceful,

the sight of your face while you sleep…

The night before Christmas, you are the best gift from heaven.


Have a happy holiday season, and God bless you and your family…

The Gordon School – composition #03 – Winter in New England -


“Winter in New England”

Winter in New England is one of my favorite times during the year. I really like it when the seasons change.

The designs on my Tenugui show aspect of the season – snowflakes, muffins, ice skates and winter hats.


Students artist showing “Winter in New England”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on December 17, 2007

Tenugui mumbling vol.09 – Tenugui Project – Japanese Design

Tuesday, November 13th, 2007

The Gordon School (Providence, RI)
Mrs. Dumville and her students

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Their artworks

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We got a letter from The Gordon School (Providence, RI) . I am so excited to showcase their projects on our web-site. This is the program in Mrs. Dumville’s class about “Japanese Design”. Their Tenugui show wonderful creativity by each student and it totally amazes me. I would like to introduce a new series on our Tenugui blog: their art program, Tenugui project and Japanese Design class. The first episode is the letter from Mrs. Dumville “Toni’s Tenugui Story”, which is a beautiful collaboration between Tenugui and The Gordon school art class. And also check out the composition “Trick or Treat”.

- The letter from Mrs. Tori Dumville -

“Toni’s Tenugui Story”

I vividly remember the first time I saw a Tenugui. As a participant in the 2007 Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund program for teachers, I had been given the honor to visit Japan for the first time. Eager to see an expansive view of the city at night, I walked from my hotel to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building and rode the elevator up 220 meters to the observation tower. June 13th at 10 in the evening, the city lights dazzled forever. But, my true inspiration would be found in the adjacent gift shop. Hydrangea blooms in colors of blue, gold and lavenders were crisply printed on pure white cotton. Folded and wrapped in acetate, it caught my eye and captured my imagination. Soon, I noticed a charming collection of assorted designs. What were these pieces of cloth? Opened up, I could see the edges were unfinished and the fabric quite soft and supple. I spent my first yen on three pieces – the hydrangea, a pattern of blue and white geometric forms, and a bold graphic design with zig zags and stripes in gray and red. It would be a while before I would discover the story behind these delightful textiles and the role they would play in my teaching. They were everywhere in Tokyo now. Men were wearing them in the Tsukiji Fish Market as they filleted tuna. In store windows, bottles of sake were wrapped in spotted cloth. My visit to the Open Air Architecture Museum provided me with some answers. The shop contained many marvelous pieces and a handbook about Tenugui.

When I returned home from Japan in early July, I was curious to know if anyone was selling Tenugui in the states. I happily discovered Ruri and her marvelous company, wuhao newyork Inc. I am grateful for her energy, enthusiasm and sincere interest in my desire to learn about Japanese culture and my work with students.

As an art instructor at the Gordon School in East Providence, RI., I designed a course this fall, called “Japanese Design” to expose students to Japanese aesthetics and culture. I introduced my middle school students to the tradition and craft of Tenugui. In the art studio, they were challenged to design a piece using images from American culture. Their individual Tenugui had to reflect their interests and experiences. Since I could not use the traditional Japanese methods for printing on fabric, I decided to teach them the technique of silk-screening. After they designed a repeat pattern, they cut our stencils to apply to screens. Students were asked to carefully select a color pallete, keeping in mind the theme and emotional quality of their particular design. The studio was filled with excitement, hard work and camaraderie as thirteen-year-old students experimented with ideas, inks and fabric to create functional art inspired by an ancient Japanese tradition. We hope you like these one of a kind Tenugui.

Toni Dumville

The Gordon School – composition #01 – Trick or Treat

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The design for my Tenugui represents the stereotypical Halloween characters! A ghost, the devil, a bone and a skull are the usual suspects for classic costumes.

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Student Artist wearing “Trick or Treat”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on November 13, 2007