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Ruri Kippenbrock


Archive for the ‘kabuki’ Category

Tenugui mumbling Vol.80 – AMANOGAWA by The Kitsune Ensemble

Sunday, December 5th, 2010
Billy Fox - composer & director of The Kitsune Ensemble

Billy Fox - composer & director of The Kitsune Ensemble

Arei Sekiguchi - Drum The Kitsune Ensemble

Arei Sekiguchi - drum

Christopher Hoffman - chello

Christopher Hoffman - chello

Gary Pickard - clarinet

Gary Pickard - clarinet

John Savage - flute

John Savage - flute

Miki Hirose - trumpet

Miki Hirose - trumpet

Yayoi Ikawa - keyboards

Yayoi Ikawa - keyboards

Yoshi Waki - bass

Yoshi Waki - bass

The Kitsune Ensemble

The Kitsune Ensemble

On Friday Decemver 17th at 8pm, AMANOGAWA will premiere at the New York Center for Art & Media Studies in Manhattan. Inspired by the Tanabata Legend, this hourlong production combines original music with contemporary theatrical techniques inspired by the Kuroko stagehands of Kabuki Theatre.

Composed by Billy Fox, with theatrical direction by Tomi Tsunoda, AMANOGAWA conbines classical, modal jazz and free improvisation, while also subtly drawing from traditional Japanese elements such as Koto tuning and Shakuhachi flute stylings.

Improvising chamber group The Kitsune Ensemble is comprised of Billy Fox as a composer & director, has previously performed at Washington DC’s Kennedy Center, the Planet Arlington World Music Series, and Manhattan’s Spring Fever Festival.

The legend of Tanabata (“Evening of the Seventh”) concerns the divine lovers Orihime (“Weaving Princess”) and Hikoboshi (“Cow Herder Star”) who are banished by Tentei (“Sky King”) to opposite sides of the impassable Amanogawa (“River of Heaven” Milky Way). On one day each year, the lovers are allowed to reunited… only to be torn apart again for the rest of the year.

The annual Tanabata Matsuri (festival), celebrate each July 7 or August 7 in numerous areas of Japan, is considered a time of hope and celebration. But AMANOGAWA interprets the story in an unconventional way, seeing the Tanabata legend as a rebuke against imposed social and occupational roles that inhibit our deepest desires and passions as individuals.

We furnished Tenugui to The Kitsune Ensemble for their World Premiere of Amanogawa. I am so excited to see how Tenugui can be used in AMANOGAWA…?
If you have any chance, please come and see their performance at the theater. Of course, I’ll be there also!

Event: World Premiere of AMANOGAWA
Date: Friday December 17th. 8pm (doors open at 7:30pm)
Venue: New York Center for Art & Media Studies
Address: 44 W 28th street. 7th floor, NY, NY 10001
Ticket: $10 at the door
Information:? www.kitsuneensemble.org/news.html

Hope to see you there!!!!!

band

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.04 – 1mm of difference

Friday, August 3rd, 2007

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Kabuki is a traditional form of Japanese theatre. Ka (歌) means Sing, Bu(舞) means Dance, and Ki(伎) means Skill. Heisei Nakamura-za performed at Lincoln Center in New York from July 16 to 22. My family name in Japanese is uncommon, and my friends and even my family said I am not like Japanese the way I am, although, I have 100% pure Japanese blood (but with low blood pressure). Anyway, I have never seen a Kabuki performance in my life. Perhaps because I was nice to a homeless person or maybe the stars aligned for me that day. I was able to get a free ticket for the play “Hokaibo” (Thank you Vanilla Graphics!!!!!) only 30-minutes before the performance began. I jumped on the subway and dashed over to Lincoln Center, and the play had just started. Needless to say, I didn’t even have enough time to go to the bathroom before the performance.

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Amazing, amazing, amazing; the story was so funny, and so was their acting. I couldn’t believe how beautiful their costumes were, how fresh the colors were, how attractive Kabuki actors are, how detailed their stage was, how interesting their music is… Most of all, the Kabuki actor Kanzaburo Nakamura’s eyes had so much emotion a 1mm of difference of expression; For me, he is art and symbolized the beauty of Japan. I could not imagine the effort and sacrifice they make in their daily lives. They have carried this traditional Japanese theatre through their family for many generations. I laughed, I smiled, I was scared, and I cried. It was not because nature was calling so badly, but rather because I was so impressed in Kabuki that 1mm of difference made whole thing perfect. Someday I would like to make Tenugui that has 1mm of difference from any other Tenugui. 1mm of difference, that is art and it makes everything perfect.

- to be continued…

From Ruri mumbling dated on August 01, 2007