wuhaonyc.com TENUGUI ONLINE SHOP

wuhaonyc Newsletter



Ruri Kippenbrock


Archive for the ‘education’ Category

Tenugui mumbling Vol.69 – Happy Father’s Day, Papa!

Sunday, June 20th, 2010
my father Kosuke Kabashima @ Beijing, China

my father Kosuke Kabashima @ Beijing, China

My father was born and lived in China?for forty years of his life. He spent his childhood in the Northern parts of Manchuria. I can’t imagine how difficult it was to live there during? World War II, and after the war,??also because he is Japanese.

He never told me about his life in China when I was little, until he wrote a book “Liu Jo” after he retired from the company that he worked at for over 30 years. “Liu Jo”?means flying seeds from willow trees. We can see “Liu Jo”? in Beijing, tons and tons of seeds fly all over the city in Spring time. He thought that his life is just like “Liu Jo”.

He is a hard worker. My mother told me that when she was pregnant, he left home for his business trip abroad, and? three days before I was born, he came back from his trip.

Life is interesting. I also spent 18-years of my life in China, and I am living in New York now, I am sure I have?been infuluenced from Father as well.

Life is balanced. He worked so hard when he was younger, not having enough time to spend with his family. Now he spends most of his?time with my mother. They are just like best friends, I guess, and have been soul mates more than 50-years!

my papa and mama in Beijing, China

my papa and mama - they both love tenugui, always have one with them.

Life is beautiful. He is?a cancer surviver. Remaining positive during his illness, spending quality?time with his wife, and teaching Chinese and Chinese business to?his students,?he passes?on his knowledge and experience to the?next generation.

I am very proud of?my father, and I am very glad to be his daughter!
Happy Father’s Day, Papa from New York!

Father's Day Girl

- to be continued…

From: Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.22 – Fall Decorataion – Japanese Design “Shaining Shape”

Sunday, November 2nd, 2008
Uses Natural Indigo Chysanthemum Tenugui as a table liner and use Autumn tenugui as chair covers,  add spice color in to your garden.

Uses Natural Indigo Chysanthemum Tenugui as a table liner and use Autumn tenugui as chair covers, add spice color in to your garden.??

?

Tea Time - Set a momiji tenugui on your favorite a cap and a saucer as a tea towel, Kagome tenugui uses as a table mat.

Tea Time - Set a momiji tenugui on your favorite a cap and a saucer as a tea towel, Kagome tenugui uses as a table mat.

?

Fall bascket - Corn tenugui uses as a basket liner.

Fall bascket - Corn tenugui uses as a basket liner.

?

Fall bowl - Pumpkins and squashes add colors on your table.

Fall bowl - Pumpkins and squashes add colors on your table.

Autumn begins! Hope everybody is enjoying this beautiful season wherever you are. The financial crisis, economy, election 2008 and many more… serious tensions surrounding us everyday. Let’s have a cup of tea in your favorite place, take a nice long breath and enjoy flavor and aroma fromyour cup. And of course, your Tenugui give you comforts and send you warmth with it.
These photos are some ideas for your Autumn Decoration! Have a wonderful Fall with your Tenugui!

New composition is here from The Gordon School. Please enjoy his joyful Tenugui art!

The Gordon School – composition #13 – Shining Shapes

“Shining Shapes”

shining shape tenugui by The Gordon School student

shining shapes tenugui by The Gordon School student

?

Shapes and colors are basic to design in art. To design my tenugui, I took that literally. The stars? show the importance of the other shapes. The colors symbolize the coral reefs in the Virgin Islands and the beautiful Caribbean Sea.

He designed and printed his own shinng shapes Tenugui.

He designed and printed his own shinng shapes Tenugui.


Students artist wearing “Shining Shapes”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Tenugui mumbling vol.14 – Gemstone – Japanese Design “Accessory”

Sunday, February 10th, 2008
How to tie tenugui? The gordon pre-school students are trying to tie their tenugui.

How to tie tenugui? The gordon pre-school students are trying to tie their tenugui.

How to tie Tenugui? Adorable photo from The Gordon School .

We received adorable photos from The Gordon School! The pre-school students enjoyed the Tenugui in Mrs. Dumville’s class. Mrs. Dumville showed them how to wear, how to wrap.. And then all students have come up with many different uses for Tenugui ? a bed for their pet, wrapping up a doll or toy, using Tenugui on the table, etc… I believe that the children are GEMSTONE. They have millions billions possibilities in their brain. Art and Music are very important education for them to discover their creativities. I hope that all children will be able to get?more support for their education under any circumstance. And wish we could give more oppotinity to discover and provide their artistic talents.., They are our precious GEMSTONES…

?


Hug Me Salt and Pepper Shakers

Don’t miss this special campaign, first 10 ? customers to purchase our Tenugui on-line before till this coming Valentine’s Day will receive Free Hug Me Salt and Pepper Shakers! We still have a few more left! Hurry up and send a sweet HUG to your Valentine!

The Gordon School – composition #06 ? Accessory -

“Accessory”

?


My tenugui shows pictures of earrings, rings, and blacelets.

Jewelry is a favorite accessory of mine. When you put images of accessories on an accessory, like this Tenugui, it makes it much more unique!

?


Students artist wearing Tenugui design “Accessory”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on February 10, 2008

Tenugui mumbling vol.13 – Tenugui museum – Japanese Design “Cooking Time”

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

?


Thank you cards from the Gordon School, they are on my treasure boxes.

?


Tenugui museum in my kitchen, the most favorite place in the world.

I got handmade Thank you cards from the young artists of The Gordon School. It was the last day of year 2007, I found a package in front of my door just before ahead to my friend place. Sitting on the subway sheet and opened a package, it was a BIG surprise from them. Each of young artists used Origami and decorated by their own creations or drawing their own designs on the cards. Thank you all and Tori, sending me such a wonderful treasure. Last day of year 2007, I was on the subway with full of happy smile and the warming greeting…one of the best day of my life!

I love cooking, especially cook for someone very special. Chopping vegetables, saute foods on the pan… The sounds of cooking, the aroma from delight dishes and love as a spice… perfect collaborations! I use Tenugui as a kitchen cloth or a place mat everyday. Because Tenugui dry fast and easy to wash by hands, not only that! They are all so beautiful. I have a special corner in my kitchen called Tenugui museum where is the most favorite place in the world now!

We made Tenugui Museum on our web-site also. Please enjoy the beauty of Tenugui at our Tenugui Museum.

The Gordon School – composition #05 ? Cooking Time -

“Cooking Time”

?


My Tenugui is filled with images of the basic utensils that you need for cooking.

I choose this subject because cooking is important to me.

?


Students artist showing “Cooking Time”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on January 16, 2008

Tenugui mumbling vol.09 – Tenugui Project – Japanese Design

Tuesday, November 13th, 2007

The Gordon School (Providence, RI)
Mrs. Dumville and her students

?


Their artworks

?


We got a letter from The Gordon School (Providence, RI) . I am so excited to showcase their projects on our web-site. This is the program in Mrs. Dumville’s class about “Japanese Design”. Their Tenugui show wonderful creativity by each student and it totally amazes me. I would like to introduce a new series on our Tenugui blog: their art program, Tenugui project and Japanese Design class. The first episode is the letter from Mrs. Dumville “Toni’s Tenugui Story”, which is a beautiful collaboration between Tenugui and The Gordon school art class. And also check out the composition “Trick or Treat”.

- The letter from Mrs. Tori Dumville -

“Toni’s Tenugui Story”

I vividly remember the first time I saw a Tenugui. As a participant in the 2007 Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund program for teachers, I had been given the honor to visit Japan for the first time. Eager to see an expansive view of the city at night, I walked from my hotel to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building and rode the elevator up 220 meters to the observation tower. June 13th at 10 in the evening, the city lights dazzled forever. But, my true inspiration would be found in the adjacent gift shop. Hydrangea blooms in colors of blue, gold and lavenders were crisply printed on pure white cotton. Folded and wrapped in acetate, it caught my eye and captured my imagination. Soon, I noticed a charming collection of assorted designs. What were these pieces of cloth? Opened up, I could see the edges were unfinished and the fabric quite soft and supple. I spent my first yen on three pieces – the hydrangea, a pattern of blue and white geometric forms, and a bold graphic design with zig zags and stripes in gray and red. It would be a while before I would discover the story behind these delightful textiles and the role they would play in my teaching. They were everywhere in Tokyo now. Men were wearing them in the Tsukiji Fish Market as they filleted tuna. In store windows, bottles of sake were wrapped in spotted cloth. My visit to the Open Air Architecture Museum provided me with some answers. The shop contained many marvelous pieces and a handbook about Tenugui.

When I returned home from Japan in early July, I was curious to know if anyone was selling Tenugui in the states. I happily discovered Ruri and her marvelous company, wuhao newyork Inc. I am grateful for her energy, enthusiasm and sincere interest in my desire to learn about Japanese culture and my work with students.

As an art instructor at the Gordon School in East Providence, RI., I designed a course this fall, called “Japanese Design” to expose students to Japanese aesthetics and culture. I introduced my middle school students to the tradition and craft of Tenugui. In the art studio, they were challenged to design a piece using images from American culture. Their individual Tenugui had to reflect their interests and experiences. Since I could not use the traditional Japanese methods for printing on fabric, I decided to teach them the technique of silk-screening. After they designed a repeat pattern, they cut our stencils to apply to screens. Students were asked to carefully select a color pallete, keeping in mind the theme and emotional quality of their particular design. The studio was filled with excitement, hard work and camaraderie as thirteen-year-old students experimented with ideas, inks and fabric to create functional art inspired by an ancient Japanese tradition. We hope you like these one of a kind Tenugui.

Toni Dumville

The Gordon School – composition #01 – Trick or Treat

?


The design for my Tenugui represents the stereotypical Halloween characters! A ghost, the devil, a bone and a skull are the usual suspects for classic costumes.

?

Student Artist wearing “Trick or Treat”

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on November 13, 2007

Tenugui mumbling vol.07 – Evolve into New Style

Tuesday, September 18th, 2007

?


Katsura Kaishi (Rakugo-ka) The world’s top performer of English Rakugo.

?


New York Hanjotei came to the Big Apple!

Rakugo “Punch-line” comedy is a form of traditional Japanese comedy story-telling. Raku (落) means Falling, Go(語) means word. “Falling” is strange expression for Laugh, don’t you think? In Japanese O-chi (落) means the punch-line, and is written the same Kanji as Raku-go’s Raku (落). Have I confused you?????
So, Rakugo (落語) means the punch-line and a word. Does make sense to you now? well….. No?

Katsura Kaishi – the world’s top performer of English Rakugo and his troop Hanjotei came to the Big apple! Wuhao newyork were so pleased be a sponsor of NY Hanjotei and to share this great art of Laugh. Since the 17th century, generations of Japanese have enjoyed comedic storytelling at the theaters and on the TV. The solo performer (called Rakugo-ka) brings scores of characters vividly to life in tales punctuated by various tones of voice, gestures, expressions and a characteristic punch line – all without standing. Dressed in full Kimono, he sits on a silk pillow and uses only two props – a fan and a Tenugui! These classical Rakugo tales have been loved for over 300-years in Japan. And now, Kaishi creates his own style that he calls “English Rakugo”, and has been bringing this art of Laugh to more than 12-countries and 31-cities all over the world. “English Rakugo” – Evolve into New Style. We hope that our Tenugui is also keeping the Japanese tradition and cultural value alive, while also creating new styles, designs, uses and the infinity of possibilities – SO – “Evolve into New Style” and share these beautiful arts of Tenugui forever.

?


Kaishi-san and me! Thank you very much for the beautiful Smile and great performance!

Dear our customers! Don’t miss this special Tenugui opportunity!

You now can choose either UPS or USPS shipping methods for your convenience.

And more special opportunity for you! We start the new campaign – FREE SHIPPING – during the coming gift season for Tenugui orders totaling more than $100!! (Only ship to inside of United State of America, not for international shipping) We will inform you the ending time for this special campaign with the advance notice.
So please hurry up and pick your favorite tenugui on our on-line shopping!

So you see, we also have evolved for this festive season! Find a unique Tenugui for someone special and enjoy the beautiful Autumn wherever you are!

- to be continued…

From Ruri

Mumbling date on September 18, 2007

Tenugui mumbling vol.04 – 1mm of difference

Friday, August 3rd, 2007

?

Kabuki is a traditional form of Japanese theatre. Ka (歌) means Sing, Bu(舞) means Dance, and Ki(伎) means Skill. Heisei Nakamura-za performed at Lincoln Center in New York from July 16 to 22. My family name in Japanese is uncommon, and my friends and even my family said I am not like Japanese the way I am, although, I have 100% pure Japanese blood (but with low blood pressure). Anyway, I have never seen a Kabuki performance in my life. Perhaps because I was nice to a homeless person or maybe the stars aligned for me that day. I was able to get a free ticket for the play “Hokaibo” (Thank you Vanilla Graphics!!!!!) only 30-minutes before the performance began. I jumped on the subway and dashed over to Lincoln Center, and the play had just started. Needless to say, I didn’t even have enough time to go to the bathroom before the performance.

?


Amazing, amazing, amazing; the story was so funny, and so was their acting. I couldn’t believe how beautiful their costumes were, how fresh the colors were, how attractive Kabuki actors are, how detailed their stage was, how interesting their music is… Most of all, the Kabuki actor Kanzaburo Nakamura’s eyes had so much emotion a 1mm of difference of expression; For me, he is art and symbolized the beauty of Japan. I could not imagine the effort and sacrifice they make in their daily lives. They have carried this traditional Japanese theatre through their family for many generations. I laughed, I smiled, I was scared, and I cried. It was not because nature was calling so badly, but rather because I was so impressed in Kabuki that 1mm of difference made whole thing perfect. Someday I would like to make Tenugui that has 1mm of difference from any other Tenugui. 1mm of difference, that is art and it makes everything perfect.

- to be continued…

From Ruri mumbling dated on August 01, 2007